Job Application Phishing Scam

by on 06/25/2012 in Scams & Hoaxes, Security

There’s an email claiming you have a job application pending in which you never submitted an application for the specific job posting. This scam tries to trick users who may have submitted applications via the internet. The link in the email goes to an untrusted domain with a poor reputation.Job Application Phishing Scam

The link goes to solidjoboffer.com claiming that you have been pre-selected to view private and available positions from multiple employers.  To start the quick 2-minute process, click the button below. The site collects personal identifiable information and sells it to 3rd party marketing firms who will send you email spam to sell other goods and services.

The domain listed above is blacklisted and considered dangerous. If you receive such an email like the one I am describing, you should ignore it, mark it as spam, and or delete it.

Actual Email

Hello

Thank you for submitting your information for potential employment opportunities. We look forward to reviewing your application, but cannot do so until you complete our internal application.

The pay range for available positions range from $35.77 per hour to $57.62 per hour. Prior to begin able to be considered, you will first need you to formally apply. Please go here to begin the process:

Link removed to protect our readers.

Also, the following perks are potentially available:
– Paid Time Off
– Health Benefits Package
– Higher than average salaries
– Tuition Reimbursement
– Extensive 401(k)program

Please take the time to follow the directions and complete the entire application process.

Best Regards

These scams are easy to spot because of grammar and spelling errors and in most cases the recipient never submitted an application. The other issue is the senders email is from the UK and I am from the USA.

2 Responses to “Job Application Phishing Scam”

  1. Mike

    Jun 26th, 2012

    Wow, that is a scary sounding scam. I use Gmail and have very few spam emails enter my inbox. I think this article is another example why people have to ensure that their spam filters are correctly set up and that they never open unknown emails.

    • Frank Jovine

      Jun 26th, 2012

      Mike,

      The problem is that scammers will just launch a new domain to pawn their scams. These domains are not listed in any spam indexes or have they been blacklisted. Spam filters are great, but not with new domains that haven’t established their reputation.