Month: May 2010

FBI File Charges Against Scareware Authors

Three men who made more than $100 million selling scareware have been charged by the FBI. They sold their fake antivirus programs in over 60 countries. The programs they sold that we published articles about are;  “Malware Alarm“, “Antivirus 2008” and “VirusRemover 2008“. Scareware has been on the rise since 2008 and it continues to be the bread winner amongst scams. Scareware tricks users into thinking their computers are infected with viruses and or malware, and in order to remove the infection, a user must purchase the products license. In most cases, the victims visit particular websites and they are then urged to purchase scareware products such as; anti-spyware and antivirus products. Such fraud was essentially outlawed at the end of 2008, when the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) got a US court to prevent two manufacturers of scareware from continuing to sell their products. The three men now facing charges did business from the US and the Ukraine via such companies as “Byte Hosting Internet Services” and “Innovative Marketing”. Facts: 15 percent of all malware is now scareware and that this percentage is still rising. Related Articles Removing Rogue Fake Antivirus How to Remove and Avoid Rogue Applications Rogue Software Rising at an Alarming Rate Misleading Applications Rising at an Alarming Rate The FBI and FTC may never stop the distribution of scareware all together, but charging these three men...

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Justin Bieber Popularity Energizes Cyber Criminals

The young and popular Justin Bieber is a great story, but for computer criminals, it’s easy bait to lure in young victims. These criminals will use Justin Bieber’s popularity in hopes that his young audience will be fooled into downloading malicious software or visiting harmful sites where the criminals will try to obtain personal information or sell products of the famous Justin Bieber to make millions in profits. You should only visit official Justin Bieber websites or fan sites that are safe. We provided a list of safe Justin Bieber websites below. If you are a fan, be careful. You should look out for anything that looks suspicious such as; Emails offering free Justin Bieber items Social network groups inviting you to become a friend or fan of Justin Bieber Instant messages about Justin Bieber websites Unofficial Justin Bieber Websites (Some are safe, but know which ones) Justin Bieber became popular when he started posted dozens of homemade videos on YouTube in 2007 to share with friends and family. The multi-talented Bieber put his impeccable spin on songs from artists like Usher, Ne-Yo and Stevie Wonder, Justin racked up over 10,000,000 views purely from word of mouth. That’s how his manager found him. He saw Justin Bieber on YouTube and contacted his family and signed him. Official / Unofficial Justin Bieber Websites http://www.justinbiebermusic.com/ (Official Site) http://www.myspace.com/justinbieber (Justin Bieber on...

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How to Detect if a Website is Dangerous

URLVoid.com is a brand new online service launched on May 21, 2010. This service was developed by NoVirusThanks Company. The service allows users to enter website addresses to detect if a website is dangerous. URLVoid analyzes URLs in a very similar way to VirusTotal by querying several URL databases. It then gives a reputation score to that URL. Urlvoid.com uses multiple scanning engines such as Google Diagnostic, McAfee SiteAdvisor, Norton SafeWeb and MyWOT. The reports are cached for 5 days to avoid the scan of the same website for too many times in the same day and to not stress the engines in use. Here is a list of engines that can be used in this service: McAfee SiteAdvisor McAfee Trusted Source BrowserDefender Norton SafeWeb MyWOT MalwareDomainList hpHosts ZeuS Tracker Google Diagnostic PhishTank Project Honey Pot ParetoLogic Spamhaus URIBL TrendMicro Web Reputation Web Security Guard Note: Even if a website comes up clean by the scanning engines listed, there’s no guarantee that the site is harmless. The engines that are used still makes a strong case that the website is more than likely...

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Beware of Fake Lijit Website

Lijit has recently discovered a malicious site that’s attempting to mimic Lijit.com and collect publisher login information. This site uses a domain very close to Lijit’s domain, but without the dot (.) after the www. The domain of the fake website is wwwligit.com and not www.lijit.com. I pretty sneaky tactic to fool a user into believing they’re being contacted by the legitimate site. According to Lijit, there’s no action needed on your part – this is just a precautionary note to keep you informed. Lijit has contacted the Domain Registrars as well as the appropriate authorities as a preventative measure. You can visit the Lijit blog for future updates on this issue. If you have any questions or see suspicious activity, please send Lijit an email at feedback@lijit.com. Please do NOT give this site your username or...

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Sexy Facebook Beach Babes come with Malware

There’s a rogue application on Facebook that is posting links on Facebook Walls that supposedly open a video showing “Distracting Beach Babes“. In fact, clicking the bogus “video” links can install the rogue app, send copies of the Malware messages to the Wall’s of the Facebook user’s friends and download Malware to the user’s computer. The Malware messages have been appearing on the Walls of many Facebook users. The messages, which look like they have been posted by friends of the Facebook user, feature a thumbnail of a woman’s bottom in a revealing bikini and a link labeled “Distracting Beach Babes HQ”. The post also includes the message: [Name of Facebook user], this is hilarious LOL :P :P :P” If the user gives permission for the rogue app to run, he or she will then be prompted to follow another link to update their Flash video player. However, clicking this “update” actually downloads and installs Adware on the user’s computer. In a blog post about this attack Graham Cluley of Security firm Sophos suggests: If you have been hit, you should delete the offending message from your page, scan your computer with an up-to-date anti-virus, change your passwords, review your Facebook application settings (to ensure you have blocked the rogue application). Also, learn an important lesson: don’t be so quick to click on unsolicited links and approve unknown applications...

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